800 222 8711 Contact Us Join Mail List Secure Mail Submit a Claim
Search magnifying glass icon
23

October 1, 2013 marks another phase in changes to the National Flood Insurance Program and flood insurance rates as a result of the Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012. In July 2012, the U.S. Congress passed the Biggert Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012, which calls on FEMA and other agencies to make changes to the way that the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is run. Some of these changes have already been put in place, and others will be implemented in the coming months. Key provisions of the legislation will require the NFIP to raise rates to reflect true flood risk, make the program more financially stable, and change how Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) updates impact policyholders.  The changes will mean premium rate changes for some - but not all - policyholders over time.

The new law encourages Program financial stability by eliminating some artificially low rates and discounts. Most flood insurance rates will now move to reflect full risk, and flood insurance rates will rise on some policies. Buying a property, allowing a policy to lapse, or purchasing a new policy can trigger rate changes. 

Not everyone will be affected immediately by the new law - only 20 percent of NFIP polices receive subsidies

  • Owners of subsidized policies on non-primary/secondary residences in a Special Flood Hazard Area will see 25% increases annually until rates reflect true risk - began January 1, 2013.
  • Owners of subsidized policies on property that has experienced severe or repeated flooding will see 25% rate increases annually until rates reflect true risk - beginning October 1, 2013.
  • Owners of subsidized policies on business/non-residential properties in a Special Flood Hazard Area will see 25% rate increases annually until rates reflect true flood risk - beginning October 1, 2013

Primary residences in Special Flood Hazard Areas will be able to keep their subsidized rates unless or until:

  • the property is sold;
  • the policy lapses;
  • you suffer severe, repeated, flood losses, or; 
  • a new policy is purchased.

Learn more about flood reform via the FEMA website, Floodsmart.gov and the special section of the FEMA website regarding the Flood Reform.

Source:  FEMA


Post Rating

Comments

There are currently no comments, be the first to post one.

Post Comment

Name (required)

Email (required)

Website

CAPTCHA image
Enter the code shown above:

 

The information provided in these articles are only general descriptions and should not be relied upon as complete, correct or accurate for your specific situation. All coverage informaiton is subject to policy provisions, endorsements and may be  subject to your meeting underwriting qualifications. Murphy Insurance Agency is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other noninsurance professional services. Consult an appropriate professional for advice regarding your own situation.